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Privacy Policy

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The Privacy Policy was updated on 29th May 2018
 
 

Please see link here to our Data Protection Policy

 

What is the right to erasure?

Under Article 17 of the GDPR individuals have the right to have personal data erased. This is also known as the ‘right to be forgotten’. The right is not absolute and only applies in certain circumstances.

When does the right to erasure apply?

Individuals have the right to have their personal data erased if:

  • the personal data is no longer necessary for the purpose which you originally collected or processed it for;
  • you are relying on consent as your lawful basis for holding the data, and the individual withdraws their consent;
  • you are relying on legitimate interests as your basis for processing, the individual objects to the processing of their data, and there is no overriding legitimate interest to continue this processing;
  • you are processing the personal data for direct marketing purposes and the individual objects to that processing;
  • you have processed the personal data unlawfully (ie in breach of the lawfulness requirement of the 1st principle);
  • you have to do it to comply with a legal obligation; or
  • you have processed the personal data to offer information society services to a child.

 

 

What is the right to object?

Article 21 of the GDPR gives individuals the right to object to the processing of their personal data. This effectively allows individuals to ask you to stop processing their personal data. 

The right to object only applies in certain circumstances. Whether it applies depends on your purposes for processing and your lawful basis for processing.

When does the right to object apply?   

Individuals have the absolute right to object to the processing of their personal data if it is for direct marketing purposes.

Individuals can also object if the processing is for:

  • a task carried out in the public interest;
  • the exercise of official authority vested in you; or
  • your legitimate interests (or those of a third party).

In these circumstances the right to object is not absolute.

If you are processing data for scientific or historical research, or statistical purposes, the right to object is more limited.

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